Wednesday, June 29

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technology

Four things that will shape 2017 for developers

Since Steve Ballmer’s famous speech a few years back, the importance of developers has grown and grown. Coding know-how has become one of the most sought-after skills to have and that shows no sign of changing any time soon. In fact, coding is so highly valued nowadays that CEO of GE, Jeffrey Immelt, said that he wants every new hire to learn to code, regardless of their job role. This is no great surprise; in fact it’s maybe more of a surprise that others aren’t following Immelt’s lead. The continued importance of mobile, acceleration of IoT deployments and growing trends such as VR, AI, digital assistants and cognitive applications all rely on harnessing the talent and creativity of the developer workforce. which investigated the reality of the digital skills shortage found tha...
technology

Fraudsters target social media as rising identity theft puts businesses at risk

A new report from fraud prevention service Cifas has revealed that identity theft is on the rise, with serious financial implications for both businesses and individuals. According to the report, identity theft rose by 57 per cent in 2015 as 148,000 Brits were affected compared to 94,500 the year before. More than 85 per cent were carried out online, with criminals increasingly using social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter as a 'hunting ground' for identities. - also known as- to gain access to corporate information. Simon Dukes, Cifas chief executive, said: 'Fraudsters are opportunists. As banks and lenders have become more adept at detecting false identities, fraudsters have focused on stealing and using genuine people's details instead. 'Society, government and i...
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German court clears Adblock Plus again in lawsuit appeal

Countless numbers of web users are completely in love with adblocking, but there are those who have tried to have it deemed illegal. Adblock Plus has been in court over this before, and today a German court has ruled, once again, that its operations are entirely legal. Publishing house Axel Springer sued Adblock Plus, saying that no company should be able to interfere with the display of ads. Axel Springer lost its case last year, but decided to appeal. Using a recent law to attack Adblock Plus' Acceptable Ads program, Axel Springer tried to get the adblocker banned. This failed, but Adblock Plus has been forced to offer free whitelisting to the publisher. : 'We have to change how we offer whitelisting to Axel Springer in Germany. Normally, because Axel Springer would probably qu...
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Get your eCommerce site ready for a bumper holiday season

With the Christmas holiday shopping frenzy starting earlier every year, now’s the time for online retailers to start planning ahead for a bumper season. This is an opportunity not to be missed for online retailers, especially as the festive season is when internet users are more likely to buy. But while the conversion rate is much higher than the rest of the year, businesses should develop an action plan to take advantage of the spike in customers. Follow these 7 techniques to boost online sales in the coming months. With just a little advance planning your e-commerce site can reap the rewards of the Christmas shopping season.  
technology

Gmail outage affects millions of corporate Google for Work users

An outage to Google's Gmail email service yesterday left many corporate users frustrated that they were unable to access their mail.Users of the company's Google for Work were unable to access their email with those in the UK and US being hit the hardest by the disruption. Google has investigated why the outage occurred and it is currently working on bringing the service back online.On its App status page, the company posted an update regarding the outage, saying: “We're investigating reports of an issue with Gmail.  We will provide more information shortly. Based on reports, it affects only Google for Work Gmail users.  The users are redirected to a page with 'Service not available, contact your administrator'.”The issue, which was apparently caused by a technical glitch, is con...
technology

Google amends restrictions on ‘free news’

In an effort to help publishers grow their subscription revenues,has announced that it will relax its rules regarding how many free articles subscription news sites have to provide to its users daily to remain high in its search results. The company's “first click free” policy has been in place for the last decade to help non-subscribers overcome paywalls when clicking on news articles from its search engine.  News sites would have to provide users with three free articles per day or risk falling lower in Google search results. that allows users to pay for subscriptions using the credit card information they have already provided for Google Play purchases.  This will allow users to quickly and easily subscribe to their favourite news outlets without having to provide an...

Google Calendar goes down, everyone panics

technology

Google Calendar goes down, everyone panics

If you happened to miss any important meetings today, just blame it on Google. Google Calendar went down for millions of users this afternoon, starting at approximately 2.45pm and lasting until just a few minutes ago (around 4.30pm). page says there is 'service disruption,' so some users may still be struggling to piece together their previously highly-organised lives. Luke Whitehead, Head of EMEA marketing at Couchbase commented: 'The need to scale to keep up with online demand is an all too familiar challenge for modern businesses. Google is no exception. To keep up with demand, speed, flexibility and scalability are crucial, this will allow Google to support millions of users across the globe, and devices, all at once. You must deliver great user experience, with a high...
technology

Google wants to know even more about you to personalise ads

Online ads aren’t going away anytime soon, and that'll keep the likes of Adblock Plus in business for the foreseeable future. But if you choose not to use an ad blocker and are therefore going to be bombarded with ads, they might as well be ads that are relevant to you, right? Google is rolling out a new feature that enables users to choose the topics they are interested in so the ads they see will be more appropriate to them. But as well as improving the ad experience for users, the new scheme means that advertisers are handed even more information about people that can be exploited for financial gain. It also enables Google to use information it gathers about users to tailor ads. - but be sure to read through all of thefirst.
technology

How big data can make cities smarter

Urban transition is today increasingly a global reality: According to the UNO, two out of three people will be living in cities by 2030, compared to 30 per cent in 1950 and 54 per cent today. In certain countries, the rate of urbanisation could even reach 80 per cent! Back in 2000, there were 213 cities with more than a million inhabitants and 23 metropolises with more than 10 million inhabitants. 2.5 billion more people will soon join the ranks of city dwellers with non-negligible consequences on transportation, housing, health, work, safety, etc. Although they currently only occupy approximately 3 per cent of the planet’s land mass, cities are already home to half of the world's population, consume 75 per cent of the energy produced and generate 80 per cent of global CO2 emissions...
technology

How to monetise apps without alienating audiences with display advertising

Like all content creators, app owners need to monetise their content to reinvest for their users - and to stay in business. Often that means turning precious screen real-estate over to advertisers, who pay to promote their products to app users. That revenue pays for new levels, new features and even new apps. Advertising comes with two specifications: an audience to promote to, and somewhere to house the message. But advertising is often an inelegant solution to a sophisticated problem. It can undermine the work and effort that app owners invest in creating rich and engaging experiences. It frustrates and it annoys app users. But it is seen as a necessary evil for those who wish to provide and consume quality content - for free - online or on mobile.